Podcast.

It's back! Memetic Hazard Series 1 (as it has become, retrospectively) ran from September 2014 more or less weekly to September 2017, at which point Josef and I called a pause to work on some other creative projects and alleviate some of the burnout that…

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Snow.

We've had a lot of snow lately, and while it's gone now, while it was here it cheered me right up. I've already established that I'm a big fan of sunshine, but thinking more on it, it's not that I don't like bad weather, I…

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At the end of everything, hold on to anything.

I remember at the end of last year when I was listening to the Giant Bomb Game of the Year deliberations, and I found myself pulling for Night In The Woods, which I hadn't played, sometimes even over games I had. Maybe it's just because I've heard Scott Benson on podcasts or seen him on Twitter and like the cut of his jib, maybe I got annoyed by Dan Ryckert's oddly insistent dislike of the main character, or maybe I'm slowly turning into a furry. Whatever the reason, I thought I should maybe play it to see if my #teamNITW instincts were justified.

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Bertie.

Just finished reading Bertrand Russell's History of Western Philosophy for the first time since I was a teenager, and while interesting, it made for somewhat odd reading. I've been going through a lot of textbooks or textbook-like things lately (which is why I haven't been writing…

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Links (III).

Simon Callow (yes, that one) on Paul Robeson—very interesting even if I don't agree with all of his conclusions.More on that David Bentley Hart translation of the New TestamentThird in a series of TYR articles about large projects/organisations that are expensive and terrible via Coase's…

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Julius Caesar.

"This would be a good wrestling venue" was my first thought when entering the performance space of the Bridge Theatre, though I at least had the grace to be suitably ashamed about it. Seating on all sides and a central performance space—it's like the Cockpit but bigger! The appeal of the venue for this staging was the fact that the audience could be made a part of it, playing the populace of Rome who are so much a part of the play. The central performance space, when I arrived, was full, with a crowd gathered around a band (as it turned out, made up of cast members) playing a variety of suitably politically charged songs (they did play Seven Nation Army but my expected "Oh, Julius Caesar" chant was nor forthcoming.) I initially thought the involvement of the audience was pretty cool, but since reading this I've somewhat changed my mind on that—it definitely seems like the standing audience members are being treated in a substantially inconsiderate manner, and greater care should have (should be!) taken about them. It shoud be possible to have the production staged in this manner without people finding it traumatic and being forced to leave.

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Pomes.

Unlike Tom, I've never really been a poetry person. I do, however, have a friend (Rachel) who has made it her mission over the last few years to get me into poetry, periodically sending me stuff—often Mary Oliver—which I will read, admit is Actually Good, then say "maybe you're right, maybe poetry is ok", then not really follow up on and go back to where I was before. Occasionally I'd be fired with enthusiasm and try a book of poetry, but I bounced off them pretty quickly. I still felt like I was picking up pebbles at the foot of an mountain, unable to find a handhold to start climbing.

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